Spot the beast

Spot the beast 44

The final beast from Salta as we are now moving to Africa again. It was spotted on some tree bark that stayed on the ground after collecting some firewood. See if you can see it.

P1190257 copy

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

?

P1190259 copy

I do not think that it was too hard… I should do better next time.

Advertisements

Spot the beast 43

Although winters at our farm in Salta are mild, sometimes we have cold nights and the occasional frost.

We buy some hardwood for our fireplace and also use fallen trees and branches to complement it.

The picture shows a pile of pine wood getting dry for next year. It also hosts an inhabitant rather tricky to spot.

P1190137 copy

?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?

Here it is, revealed for you. It was quite difficult, I know! A real master at camouflage!

P1190140 copy

Spot the beast 40

This took place while walking up the hill in Itiyuro in search of the macaws. See my earlier post.

For a change I spotted this little fellow running and then lost it when it stopped. After a while searching it moved again at the time that we were almost about to abandon our search.

I am sure that you will find it.

20180331_121041 copy ?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?

Just in case you did not spot it, I took a couple more pictures as it was really a nice youngster although we could not identify it.

P1180957 copy

P1180960 copy

Spot the beast 39

After a quiet spell in South America, enjoying social and rural life, we traveled to the very north-eastern tip of Argentina to a place called Itiyuro-Tuyunti dam, invited by our farm neighbours.

While I write a couple of posts about the trip, I thought interesting to present you with this easy “Spot the beast” to keep you busy…

P1180986 copyP1180988 copyP1180974 copy

We came across this rather beautiful beast while walking through the subtropical forest and it was often feeding on this particular plant that has these interesting flowers. The butterfly is probably Anteos clorinde or Sulfur spot. While the external part of its wings resembles a green leaf, its interior is white with a yellow spot on its upper part. The internal coloration is mainly seen while flying as it closes its wings when landing.

It is a fairly large butterfly of about 85mm that flies strongly during the times of sunshine over open spaces and forests. It is often observed near wet areas where they congregate to drink and get mineral salts.

Spot the beast 37

From the rather prolific garden in Harare for you to find:

DSCN9950 copy

?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?

DSCN9949 copy

A young praying mantis doing its job in insect control.

Closely related to cockroaches and termites, there are over 2,400 species of mantises -both flying and flightless- worldwide. They feed on other insects but not necessarily all of them damaging to agriculture!. Larger species can even hunt small reptiles and birds and about 30% of wild males get cannibalized by their sexual partners.

They have flexible necks that enables them to turn their heads 180 degrees, a feat that no other insect can do and, although they have two large and bulging eyes, they only have one “ear” located in their abdomen so their hearing is limited.

 

Spot the beast 35

We found this beast while driving from Twee Rivieren to Nossob while heading towards the Mabuasehube area of the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park. Although we did not have time to spare, we stopped and watched.

See if you can find it and identify it…

DSC_0137 copy

?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
A zoomed version looks like this:

DSC_0135 copy

We found four African wildcats (Felis lybica kafra) that morning. Here is another one, also quite difficult to see as it moved away from us through the tawny grass.

1855 copy 1

1855 copy

A close-up.

It is the second time we see these interesting cats. Earlier last year we had a fleeting encounter with one while staying at Mopane rest camp in Kruger National Park.

Of interest is that these cats are threatened not by poachers or poisoning but by their tendency to interbreed with domestic cats anywhere near human habitations threatening the genetic purity of this subspecies!.

 

Spot the beast 34 (ID)

Regarding the post on the moth I published yesterday (Spot the moth 34) , I am now able to name it as the Mealy hawkmoth (Platysphinx piabilis). This moth feeds on plants of the Fabaceae family such as Peawood (Craibia zimmermanni), Giant Umzimbeet (Millettia sutherlandii), Cork bush (Mundulea sericea) and Pterocarpus spp. 

My thanks go to Mr. Roy Goff that helped with the identification. Roy manages a great moth identification site: http://www.africanmoths.com/index.html that I find a great help.

Here is another picture of the moth for you to enjoy.

DSCN1284 copy

 

Reference

http://www.africanmoths.com/pages/SPHINGIIDAE/SMERINTHIINAE/platysphinx%20piabilis.html