Spot the beast 37

From the rather prolific garden in Harare for you to find:

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A young praying mantis doing its job in insect control.

Closely related to cockroaches and termites, there are over 2,400 species of mantises -both flying and flightless- worldwide. They feed on other insects but not necessarily all of them damaging to agriculture!. Larger species can even hunt small reptiles and birds and about 30% of wild males get cannibalized by their sexual partners.

They have flexible necks that enables them to turn their heads 180 degrees, a feat that no other insect can do and, although they have two large and bulging eyes, they only have one “ear” located in their abdomen so their hearing is limited.



Live Cham 4

A short update of the situation with the gravid chameleon.

We saw the female again in the early hours of the 28 Jan and it was moving in the poinsettia bush. IMG_3156 copy

An hour later it had disappeared and despite our thorough search in the original poinsettia and surrounding bushes, we could not find it! We checked on the ground as we were convinced that it would not walk more than a few metres around the bush. Still nothing!

We got concerned about its fate as we know that pied crows are around and that they are capable of killing chameleons. However, there was not much else we could do. Stephen would have found it but it was his day off so there was no hope there.

There was lots of hope in other parts of the garden though. The female we saw digging the nest during the night of the 26 Jan (Live Cham 3) had finished its job as described and then it left quietly. The nest area is now fenced and protected.

In addition, a third female was spotted at a passion fruit plant and she was also gravid and very active.

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Yesterday (28 Jan) it changed position to a lemon tree, walking about 10m to get to it.

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The female moving through the grass.

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Searching for a suitable spot.

It climbed on the tree through a stick and remained on the tree for rest of the day.

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It eventually decided to climb up a lemon tree. The eggs bulging through the skin can be seen in its ventral part.

Luckily yesterday (28 Jan) Stephen returned home by mid afternoon and immediately located the missing female that we had lost earlier during the morning! It had moved 33m! to another area of soft earth and it was busy digging, despite its rather bulgy belly. By the time we left it last night, it could go in its totality inside the hole but it was already dark for pictures. We protected her again to avoid dog interference and left.

This morning, as with the previous female, it had finished and covered the hole, looking dark and rather quiet. I am sure it will soon recover and move away.

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So we are now left with the third female that has now climbed down from the lemon tree and it is -again- walking in the garden, looking for the right spot to lay her eggs.

As we are traveling to Uruguay before dawn tomorrow, this is the last post from Zimbabwe but I will resume once I touch down at the other end.

In any case, I am beginning to think that next year we will have a “chameleon population explosion”!



Live Cham 3

After the last post we have observed the gravid female until this morning (27 Jan) and she has hardly moved from the poinsettia bush. She is clearly waiting for her time to come. So, not a lot of news there, I am afraid. Only a few pictures of her.

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She spent most of the 26 Jan on top of this bush.

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Still there this morning (27 Jan)

However, lo and behold, three (yes, 3) more suspected females were found  in different places, looking in various degrees of gestation! The situation became almost out of control! But things got really bad when my post-siesta time was interrupted with calls of “it is digging, it is digging!” proffered by Stephen and my wife that were watching at the time.

After my first -sluggish- reaction I joined them to watch chameleon 2 effectively digging her egg nest project next to the bayleaf bush! I took a video (26/ Jan, late afternoon) of the action:

As the process was not done before dusk, we protected the site from our dogs and came back this morning.

The chameleon had finished laying, covered the hole and it is there, probably resting after such an effort!

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The female after the effort!

One done, three to go… More info coming soon…

Live Cham 2

As promised, I had followed the evolution of the gravid chameleon throughout the day. These are the observations so far from this morning:

09:00 Still in the same bush but its colour changed.

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12:00 Started to rain quite heavily. Cham still in the same bush when rain started.

12:30 Rain stopped. Found again. I had moved to another smaller flower bush about 1m apart:

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12:30 to 1515 Observer’s lunch and siesta. No data!

15:35 Moved another metre to a Poinsettia bush (Euphorbia pulcherrima) and climbed about 150cm high. Colour changed again. It appears that coloration is more a reflection of the animal condition than its surroundings!

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1600 to 16:20 hs Shower.

1627 The chameleon is still a the same spot but head down and green in colour.

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It is now 17:10 hs and I will have a last look before night fall.

Hope to find it tomorrow…

Live Cham

There was some excitement this morning when a chameleon was found in the garden. I thought it was a bit exaggerated for such event but I was not right (again).

Stephen had spotted a rather fat chameleon that on close inspection revealed that it was gravid! So, as this is happening right now as I write, I post a few pics to show this great creature on its bush.

I am watching her every hour with the binocs to avoid disturbing her but to follow her “progress”.

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“Spot the chameleon”. The Masau (Ziziphus mauritiana) bush where the female was found.

Here it is:

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There she is hanging on!

A few more pictures to show you her condition:

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From above to show her enlarged body. A true egg sac!!!

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The eggs can be seen protruding in the ventral area.

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A sideways picture that shows the mass of eggs better.

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Despite her condition, her eyes still keep track of you!

As I think it is quite close to laying time and I hope to see her digging her nest, I am checking on her hourly hoping that it will happen soon and before nightfall!

I will keep you posted on developments…

Seriously cute!

If you like chameleons like us, there are few things nicer than the start of the warm season when they become active and appear in the garden. They are incredible animals.

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They are not only able to change their colour to adjust to their surroundings but also to independently change the colour of each side of their bodies in a feat I find amazing but that I only observed once and could not photograph.

Apart from that, I am also fascinated by their ability to move their eyes in all directions, another of their special talents.

However, you have seen nothing until you find a baby chameleon and yesterday Stephen (our caretaker) find not one but two of them!

The gestation period of the flap-necked chameleons (Chamaeleo dilepis) lasts about 30 days and the female bury the eggs that would hatch only nine months later, quite a long period for such a small animal!

But I do not delay you anymore and present you with a few pictures of our find.

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We released them immediately after taking these pictures to avoid them getting too stressed and we hope to see them as grown-ups next year!

Magic realism?

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines magic realism as “painting in a meticulously realistic style of imaginary or fantastic scenes or images”.[1] I thought that magic realism was the stuff of some writers in our presently far land of South America such as García Marquez or Borges. My mind changed yesterday morning.

We found the wooden baboon behind the garage when we returned to our house in 2013. As the place had been rented to various tenants during our twelve-year absence, neither us nor Stephen-our caretaker- know how it got there. Although ugly, it has been allowed to stay as we are somehow fond of it.

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So, yesterday when my wife shook my otherwise placid lunch hour by shouting “Look! Nero is chasing a baboon!” It took me a while to react and join her at the kitchen window, too late to actually see our dog breathing down a large and furry baboon’s neck across our driveway! However, I did spot the primate after it managed to climb a tree next to the garage. Although this gave the monkey a pause to rest, it soon jumped off and ran again with the dog in hot pursuit until, after a second, it was lost behind the garage.

By the time we managed to get out of the house and arrive to the seen, all that remained was a very agitated dog but there was no trace of the fugitive. We climbed to the vantage point that enables us to look at our neighbour”s garden but we saw no further signs of the baboon. It all happened so fast that I started to believe that it did not happen. For obvious reasons I will omit my wife’s reply when I hinted this to her!

Then, with the corner of my eye I saw the wooden baboon and understood it all. We had noted that over the years he had been gradually eaten by termites and transformed into a dry mud-filled wooden husk and I am convinced that yesterday it was the exact time when its spirit left the shell to go wherever baboon souls go, before the next rainy season finally dissolves its crust into oblivion! Unluckily for the soul, the dog saw it and hastened its departure.

I am convinced that this is what took place but, please note that I have not shared my explanation with anyone, yet…






[1] https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/magic realism